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Speech and rhetoric in Statius" Thebaid by William J. Dominik

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Published by Olms-Weidmann in Hildesheim, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Thebes (Greece)

Subjects:

  • Statius, P. Papinius,
  • Statius, P. Papinius -- Literary style.,
  • Seven against Thebes (Greek mythology) in literature.,
  • Rhetoric, Ancient.,
  • Speeches, addresses, etc., Latin -- History and criticism.,
  • Sibling rivalry in literature.,
  • Polyneices (Greek mythology),
  • Eteocles (Greek mythology),
  • Latin language -- Style.,
  • Thebes (Greece) -- In literature.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 364-369) and indexes.

StatementWilliam J. Dominik.
SeriesAltertumswissenschaftliche Texte und Studien,, Bd. 27
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPA6698 .D66 1994
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 377 p. ;
Number of Pages377
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1211080M
ISBN 103487098148
LC Control Number94207302
OCLC/WorldCa30138487

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Speech and rhetoric in Statius' Thebaid. [William J Dominik] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Publius P.; Thebais.; Publius Papinius Statius; Publius Papinius Statius: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: William J Dominik. Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC. This is the only book-length study of the speeches in Statius’ Thebaid to be published. It examines in detail the background and formulation of the speeches, their role in the narrative and thematic design of the epic, and other matters pertaining to. Home; This edition; , English, Latin, Book edition: Speech and rhetoric in Statius' Thebaid / William J. Dominik. Dominik, William J. More recently, W. Dominik, Speech and Rhetoric in Statius' Thebaid, Hildesheim, , p. has a detailed discussion of rhetorical elements in the Sminthiac prayer and their derivation, identifying the conclud- ing lines (1,) as a syncretistic reference, p.

His publications on Roman literature include Speech and Rhetoric in Statius' Thebaid. Review Quotes ' Students of Statius will be grateful to Dominik for the extensive and up-to-date bibliography he provides, and by the chronology of Statius' life that reflects the current state of thought on the subject. Dominik a: Dominik, W. J. Speech and Rhetoric in Statius’ Thebaid (Hildesheim, ) Dominik b: Dominik, W. J. The Mythic Voice of Statius: Power and Politics in the Thebaid (Leiden, ). This book argues that the Thebaid reworks themes, scenes, and ideas from Virgil in order to show that the Aeneid's representation of monarchy is inadequate. It also demonstrates how the Thebaid's fascination with horror, spectacle, and unspeakable violence is tied to Statius' critique of the moral and political virtues at the heart of the. In Statius’ Thebaid , the poet uses a striking simile in order to describe Jocasta’s attempt to stop Eteocles from confronting Polynices on the battlefield. He compares her to Agave when she brings her son’s head to Dionysus.

  Dominik, W.J., Speech and Rhetoric in Statius’ Thebaid (Olms ), Statius discusses how Lucan’s epic Bellum Civile is a proper monument to Pompey the Great: Pharo cruenta/Pompeio dabis altius sepulcrum (‘you will give Pompey a . Introduction. 1 In the fourth book of Statius’ Thebaid, the expedition of the Seven against Thebes is stranded in ted by thirst – Bacchus has caused a drought in Nemea in order to delay the expedition against his favourite city – the Argives encounter Hypsipyle nursing Opheltes, son of Lycurgus and Eurydice, king and queen of Nemea. The mythic voice of Statius: power and politics in the Thebaid. (Leiden, ), id. Speech and rhetoric in Statius’ Thebaid (Hildesheim, ), Lovatt, Helen, Statius and epic games: sport, politics, and poetics in the Thebaid, McNelis, Charles Statius’ Thebaid and . Statius, Thebaid 8 / Composed at the end of the first century CE, Statius' Thebaid recounts the civil war in Thebes between the two sons of Oedipus, Polynices and Eteocles, and the horrific events that take place on the g: Speech and rhetoric.